Keynotes

Planning of Transport Networks - A Vision

Dominic Schupke

Dominic Schupke

Dominic A. Schupke received his Dipl.-Ing. degree from RWTH Aachen in 1998 and his Dr.-Ing. degree from Munich University of Technology (TUM) in 2004. He is with Nokia Siemens Networks (NSN) in Munich, Germany and manages the Multi-Layer Networks and Resilience Group at NSN Research. Prior to NSN he was with Siemens and the Institute of Communication Networks at TUM. Since March 2009 he has instructed the course "Network Planning" at TUM.

His research interests are in the area of transport networks. This includes network architectures and protocols (optical networks, IP/MPLS networks, Ethernet networks, multilayer networks, control plane, virtualization), routing and wavelength assignment, recovery methods, availability analysis, critical infrastructures, network optimization, and network planning. He is author or co-author of more than 15 journal contributions and over 75 conference papers.

Dominic has been technical program committee member for IEEE conferences Globecom, ICC, and INFOCOM, as well as for OFC, DRCN, and ONDM. He was Technical Program Co-Chair of OFC 2011 and of the optical symposium at ICC 2009. He serves as Associate Editor of the IEEE/OSA Journal of Optical Communications and Networking, as Editor for IEEE Communications Surveys & Tutorials, and as Editorial Board Member of the Elsevier Optical Switching and Networking journal.

Dominic is Senior Member of IEEE, and member of Comsoc, VDE/ITG, and VDI.

Abstract

The talk provides a vision on the future network planning of transport networks and indicates supporting steps and trends toward it. Network planning has to face a multiplicity of optical and electrical technologies that are treated in a multilayer constellation across core, metro, mobile backhaul, access, and datacenter areas.

The network planner's environment includes a rich set of means to address regular cases and a platform to tailor to special tasks, using an adaptive visualization, interaction interfaces, and a knowledge database. The environment has seamless integration with operations such as control and management plane, an interface to surrounding databases using standardized description languages, and access to advanced entities for fast processing (clouds, special chips, ...) These entities open the floor for sophisticated computation methods to reach provable optimality and high modeling precision.

The total cost of ownership (TCO) of the analyzed scenarios can be easily estimated, using advanced uncertainty modeling, and complete network report can be issued for the concrete planning tasks. The interaction with operations (e.g. data from the control plane) and the modeling of operational conditions (e.g. routing policies) enable close-to-reality solutions and avoid inconsistencies.

Green Networking and Resilience

Piet Demeester

Piet Demeester

Piet Demeester is professor in the faculty of Engineering at Ghent University. He is head of the research group “Internet Based Communication Networks and Services” (IBCN) that is part of the Department of Information Technology (INTEC) of Ghent University. He is also leading the Future Internet (Networks, Media and Service) Department of the Interdisciplinary Institute for Broadband Technology (IBBT). He is Fellow of the IEEE.

After finishing a PhD on Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy for photonic devices in 1988, he established a research group in this area working on different material systems (AlGaAs, InGaAsP, GaN). This research was successfully transferred to IMEC in 2002 and resulted in 12 PhDs and 300 publications in international journals and conference proceedings. In 1992 he started research on communication networks and established the IBCN research group. The group is focusing on several advanced research topics: Network Modeling, Design & Evaluation; Mobile & Wireless Networking; High Performance Multimedia Processing; Autonomic Computing & Networking; Service Engineering; Content & Search Management and Data Analysis & Machine Learning. The research of IBCN resulted in about 50 PhD's, 1250 publications in international journals and conference proceedings, 30 international awards and 4 spin-off companies.

Abstract

In this keynote presentation, the growing importance of energy-efficiency in today’s and tomorrow’s communication networks will be highlighted and some promising directions for improvement and research challenges will be highlighted. The presentation will also highlight problems related to network and infrastructure resilience. The dependence on renewable energy resources such as wind and solar power for instance, which are typically capricious in nature, can have a large impact on the availability of the network and the end devices directly fed by these renewable sources. Carbon footprint comparisons, taking into account the full life cycle of involved equipment, will shed a light on the desirability of such network and energy scenarios.